Welcome to Reviews OnLine: Q&A: How do you fight a virus?
QA
Contents
Reviews
News
Archives
 
How do you fight a virus?
by Rick Smith (October 1998)

Fighting a virus is not a fun task. I would say that it is akin to fighting a brush fire. Unlike a fire, someone can have an older, non destructive virus on their machine without realizing it. And certainly, people can have viruses on their diskettes and fail to realize it, so even if you remove the virus from their computer, they can get a virus back again, minutes after you leave. (It's almost like having the fire department put a fire out in your backyard and then, within minutes after their leaving, start flinging lit matches into the unburned areas.)

I fought an outbreak of viruses in a small two hundred person division of a Fortune 500 company, while I was a consultant. If you find yourself in a similar position, here are some things you may find:

1. In some companies, no one truly cares about the total problem. Unless everyone (especially managers) are losing their work and as long as the servers are running fine, the IT department could care less.

2. Once individuals find out about the problem and that they could lose THEIR work, they really care, even if management doesn't. When people whom you help talk to others, these other people will want their machines checked for viruses and this "fire" of enthusiasm will build.

3. Use a good virus checker. I don't mean the one with the largest rebate this week or even the corporate choice. Chose one you would trust for your machine, AT HOME!

After this, it will be your ability to work with others (inter-personal skills) that will help you eradicate the problem. The the best way to fight viruses is to eliminate them BEFORE they even have ANY chance to infect the company. This is difficult to do without having management that is interested in solving the problem. An acquaintance told me that in Europe there are several computers in the lobby of some companies. Any diskettes going into that company MUST be checked on one of these machines. How did they monitor it? Simple, if a virus was found on your diskette, you were fired. That certainly makes the virus problem easier to solve.

Copyright 1998 Rick Smith All rights reserved.

   
Article Indexes
  Products Index
  People Index
  Events Index

Product Briefs
Desktop PCs & Servers
  Ergo Thunder Brick 2
Eizo FlexScan Displays
Future Power epower
HP NetServer LXr 8500
Meridian Snap! Server
Digital Cameras
  3Com HomeConnect
Agfa ePhoto 780c
Canon A5 Zoom
Kodak DC265
Minolta 3D 1500
Nikon D1
Olympus C2000
Sharp VN-EX1U MPEG4
Toshiba PDR-M4 & M5
Notebooks & Mobile
  3Com Palm VII
Fosa Mini Notebook
Pionex Elite
Quantex Celeron Laptop
Sharp Actius PC-A250
Sony F250/F290 Notebooks
Talontek MPC-2000
Mobile/Wireless Communications
  3Com 56K GSM Modem
Novatel Merlin Modem
Xircom Ethernet CompactCard
Mobile Software
  Etak Traffic Touch
DataViz Documents To Go
Softbook E-book System
Scanners
  Agfa SnapScan Touch
Visioneer Strobe Pro
Printers
  Brother MP-21 C Portable
Tektronix Phaser 780
Xerox 480cx
Software & Books
  Avid Cinema for Windows
Caere PageKeeper Pro
Corex Area Code Fix
Docent Outliner
Macmillan Office 2K Books
Paragon FoneSync
Symantec pcAnywhere 9.0
Sybari Antigen 5.5
V-Communications AutoSave
Projectors
  InFocus 330
Mitsubishi S120
Internet
  Club Photo
Intelliquis Traffic Builder
NETSilicon NET+Works
Panasite Web Builder
PhotoHighway.com
SuperCalendar.com
Storage
  Calluna 250 Mb PCCard
Castlewood 2.2Gb ORB
Iomega Clik!
Teac CD-W 54E
Batteries & Power
  Duracell Ultra Battery
Electrofuel PowerPad
Eveready Energizer ACCU
Graphics & Video
  Belkin USB Video Bus
Daeyang VR Headset
Kodak/Intel Picture CD
Nogatech USB TV
Number Nine SR9
Peripherals
  Logitech Cordless mouse
Raritan Switchman
Targus USB MiniMouse
 
 
Reviews OnLine Contents About Reviews OnLine Site Index Search Reviews OnLine Site Index Search Reviews OnLine